Building a Strong Food Safety Program in Food Service

According to a 2015 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report, there has been a rise in multistate foodborne illness-related outbreaks. Based on these numbers, it is evident that now is the time to re-evaluate current food safety practices to ensure foodservice establishments are doing everything they can to mitigate the risk of foodborne illness, which can be incredibly costly to both their bottom line and reputation. In this article published in the August/September 2016 issue of Food Quality & Safety, learn about the key components that go into building a strong food safety program.

Food Sanitation is necessary at both the kitchen/industry where the food is being prepared, as well as at personal level. This is to ensure that there are no undesirable substances that would cause diseases or illness.

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According to a 2015 CDC report, there has been a rise in multistate foodborne illness-related outbreaks. In fact, the CDC reports that in 2014 alone, there were 864 foodborne disease outbreaks, resulting in 13,246 illnesses, 712 hospitalizations, 21 deaths, and 21 food recalls. Based on these numbers, it is evident that food service establishments need to re-evaluate current food safety practices to ensure they are doing everything they can to mitigate the risk of foodborne illness, which can be incredibly costly to both their bottom line and reputation.

 

Sanitation in Food

There are three main types of hazards or contaminants that can cause unsafe food: Biological, chemical, and physical. Biological includes microorganisms; chemical includes cleaning solvents and pest control; and physical means hair, dirt, or other matter.

 

Listeria frequently makes headlines. It is unique in that it can grow at low temperatures, whereas other bacteria need higher temperatures to grow. Another key attribute of Listeria is that can come from the environment and is spread to the food through cross-contamination. It is most dangerous for immunocompromised individuals, especially pregnant women, because it can lead to infant mortality.

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  1. coli, which causes intestinal illness and has been linked to many outbreaks, can cause an infection even if you ingest only small amounts, according to the Mayo Clinic. The most common way to acquire an E. coli infection is by eating contaminated food, including fresh produce. The bacteria is spread by a fecal-to-oral route—it can start at the farm with contamination and then infect by the food not being prepared properly (e.g. not cooked to the correct temperature), poor hand hygiene, or cross-contamination due to not properly cleaning and sanitizing surfaces.

Salmonella is another bacteria often associated with foodborne illness that affects the intestinal tract. It is prevalent in food, and food animals such as cattle, pigs, and chickens, according to the World Health Organization. Eating food contaminated with feces is the most common way people become infected with Salmonella.

Norovirus is a highly contagious virus that is spread most commonly through human-to-food-to-human contact in a food service environment due to poor hand hygiene. This virus often survives for weeks in the environment. Humans can still be infectious and transfer the virus even if they are not showing any symptoms.

 

Hepatitis A is a viral infection that can be prevented through vaccination. However, unvaccinated people can become infected by a fecal-to-oral route of exposure—ingestion of contaminated feces, which is why proper handwashing, specifically after using the restroom, is important. Other preventive measures include getting a vaccination and avoiding eating raw or undercooked oysters and shellfish. Symptoms of Hepatitis A infection include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, headache, and yellowing of the skin and eyes.

Camplylobacter typically comes from raw or undercooked poultry. FoodSafety.gov emphasizes that it’s critical to properly handle poultry in order to prevent cross-contamination and to cook and hold poultry at safe minimum temperatures.

The Importance of Mosquito Prevention

As we all know that mosquito can cause many diseases, so it is important for food industries to have s mosquito trap to fight mosquito.

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The best way to prevent getting sick is to protect your customers and employees from mosquito bites with QM mosquito trap. QM mosquito killers are based on the theory that mosquitoes are attracted to heat, CO2 and many other factors. So to make sure they are following the right scent, mosquitoes will start by tracing the CO2 scent back to its origin. Once close enough the mosquito will start tracking the heat and finally once everything is correct they will prey for the target and thus setting our trap in motion. Like MBOX electric mosquito killer that is designed from the bottom up and is assembled without any screws; with just a gentle twist the MBOX mosquito trap can be disassembled to remove any unwanted ‘dead mosquitoes’. Get more information from http://mbox-qm.com

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